Archive for the ‘Train the Trainer’ Category

Using Activities to Make Training Fun

Most people have been at a party or some other social occasion where someone has told an inappropriate joke and ruined the mood (at least temporarily). Likewise, we’ve all been somewhere where the class clown is able to lighten the mood and help people have fun.

The good news is that humor can help you make your training sessions just as engaging as those fun social occasions. Even better, you don’t need to be the class clown or an award-winning comedian to do it. This one-day workshop will help you identify what kind of humor you can bring to the classroom, and how games can help you engage your participants.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how training can include the use of humor and games
  • Use different types of games
  • Identify methods to elicit participant buy-in
  • Use humor principles in adult learning
  • Troubleshoot when games go badly
  • Develop their own games

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Let’s Have Some Fun!
We will begin the day with a brief review of the learning cycle and adult learning principles. We will also discuss the value of games in training. Participants will then have an opportunity to share their favorite training game.

Getting Everyone on Board
During this session, we will discuss three things that can help participants see the value of training games. We will also discuss some great game experiences and some games that flopped, and what we can take away from these lessons.

Choosing the Right Game
Preparation is key to the success of any trainer. This session will discuss some different types of games and activities. We’ll also talk about how to deal with reluctant participants.

When Games Go Badly
Despite our best intentions and planning, sometimes a game won’t work. We will discuss how to anticipate, avoid, and deal with problems.

Using Humor in Training
It’s not hard to be funny; just be CREATIF! We will explore each letter of this acronym during this session.

Wavy Lines
To break the day up and illustrate some of our key points, participants will take part in a quick, fun energizer.

Quick and Easy Games
Participants will take part in three easy games that can be adapted for many situations. Then, they will discuss the games from a trainer’s perspective.

Creating a Game
To wrap up the day, participants will work in small groups to create their own game.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

The Practical Trainer

Most people who call themselves trainers today probably didn’t start out to be trainers. They often work in a field where they develop extensive knowledge and then are asked to share what they know. Many trainers have some experience with teaching, writing, or leadership, although they come from nearly every field.

As such, people who work as trainers are often put into difficult situations without much understanding of what training is or how to do it well. We know that being a good trainer is the result of developing skills to bring information to an audience. This information will then engage, empower, and encourage continued learning and development.

This three-day course will give you the skills that you need so that your students not only learn, but also enjoy the process, retain information shared, and use their new skills back in the workplace.

Participants will also have the opportunity to conduct a short group training session that incorporates these training concepts.

Learning objectives will include:

  • Recognize the importance of considering the participants and their training needs, including the different learning styles and adult learning principles.
  • Know how to write objectives and evaluate whether these objectives have been met at the end of a training session.
  • Develop an effective training style, using appropriate training aids and techniques.
  • Conduct a short group training session that incorporates these training concepts.

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining a Successful Training Program
To start the day, participants will be asked to think about what successful training looks like. This will segue into a discussion of different audiences and their expectations. Participants will also look at some situations that could identify a need for training, and some of the benefits that training can bring.

What Makes a Successful Trainer?
Next, participants will discuss the characteristics of a successful trainer, including how to stimulate a readiness to learn. Participants will also look at common mistakes made by trainers, and they will brainstorm some ways to avoid or resolve those issues.

A Word about Adult Learning
During this session, participants will explore the differences between adult and child learners in small groups.

The Learning Process
The adult learning process has four distinct steps. Participants will look at each step and discuss how they can use this model to help trainees learn.

Principles of Adult Learning
This session will explore the key principles of adult learning through an exercise and small group work.

The Learning Process
In this session, participants will explore the four basic steps in learning. Participants will also explore some ways to cover all points of the cycle in a training program.

What’s Your Type? How About Mine?
During this session, we will look at four main types of trainers. Participants will explore their type and discuss how this knowledge can help them become better trainers. The session will wrap up with a discussion of the experiential learning process.

Applying the Learning Cycle
For every learning point we make, trainers must consider the learning cycle to ensure that the learners get it. This session will explore the cycle through two different exercises.

Introverts and Extroverts
Another powerful aspect to understanding yourself and others is to recognize whether you are an introvert or an extrovert. This session will ask participants to consider which side they fall on, and how to use that knowledge in training.

The Training Process
This session will introduce the six basic steps in the training process and discuss the first step: performing a needs analysis.

Planning Training
The next two steps in the training process are to develop the training and prepare employees. We will examine these steps through a lecture and group work.

Choosing Training Methods
The fourth step of the training process is to conduct the training. During this session, we will begin looking at some key parts of this step, including training methods and environmental concerns.

Designing a Learning Sequence
This session will introduce participants to the four parts of an effective learning sequence. Then, participants will practice creating a few sequences of their own.

Adding Games
Continuing with the fourth step, participants will learn how to choose games to add to their training.

Setting the Climate
This session will discuss some of the key factors that set the training climate.

Presentation Skills
During this session, participants will explore some different ways to communicate with the audience, including telling, showing, non-verbal communication, and using notes. Participants will also examine some different types of visual aids that they can use and how best to use them.

Dealing with Difficult Trainees
Participants will complete a brainstorming exercise to identify types of difficult trainees and ways to deal with them.

On-the-Job Training
Job instruction training (or on-the-job training) is becoming more and more prevalent. This session will discuss a four-step plan to make job training a success.

Training Presentations
We have set aside this time for participants to present their short training program.

Evaluations
It’s now time to go back to the fifth step of the training process: evaluations. We will examine several methods that participants can use to evaluate the success of their program.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Survival Skills for the New Trainer

Few people choose training and development while they are still in school, and yet there are talented and knowledgeable trainers working in every industry. Some individuals become trainers because they are passionate about sharing their knowledge and about helping people. Others become trainers because their employer asks them to get involved in mentoring, training, or coaching new or existing employees. Trainers also get started when they want to make some changes to their daily activities, but wish to continue contributing to a particular organization or industry.

If you are thinking about becoming a trainer, or have started doing some training already and want to know more about what will help you to become an excellent trainer, this workshop will help. This one-day workshop is designed as an exploration of the essential skills that trainers need to develop, and to get you started in the learning process in an interactive and fun environment.

This one-day workshop will help you teach participants:

  • The essential background for trainers to have
  • How being genuine enhances training
  • The elements of good questions
  • How to apply listening skills
  • Rapport building strategies
  • The key skills in a trainer’s toolbox
  • How to identify skill areas for development

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

What Makes a Good Trainer?
To start the day, we will discuss some key background material, including principles of adult learning and what the word “trainer” means.

Personal Best, Professional Best
Next, participants will learn how to create a professional image.

Being Genuine
During this session, participants will explore what being genuine means.

Assertiveness Skills
Participants will explore the differences between passive, aggressive, manipulative, and assertive behavior. They will also consider why assertive behavior is important for a trainer.

Asking the Right Questions
This session will focus on open questions, closed questions, and probing. Participants will also have an opportunity to practice these skills in an exercise.

Listening
Participants will identify their listening strengths and weaknesses through a quick quiz. We will also discuss some ways that participants can improve their listening skills.

Connecting With People
During this session, we will look at ways to build rapport and how to use facilitative training. Participants will then evaluate themselves to see what skills they need to build in these areas.

Defusing Difficult Participants
Next, we will look at some potential problem situations and ways to defuse them before they start.

Essentials for Success
We will ask participants to complete a checklist of what attributes they feel makes a good trainer. This will also help participants identify areas for further training.

Do’s and Don’ts for New Trainers
To wrap up the learning points, participants will discuss a checklist of do’s and don’ts.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions, complete an action plan, and talk with the trainer.

Facilitation Skills

It is impossible to be part of an organization today and not attend meetings. Staff meetings, project meetings, and planning and coordinating meetings all take time.

There has been a growing realization that we have to pay attention to the process elements of meetings if we want them to be effective. With its focus on asking rather than telling, and listening to build consensus, facilitation is the new leadership ideal, the core competency everybody needs. Managers and supervisors are often asked to facilitate rather than instruct or manage their meetings and training sessions.

How can you facilitate, rather than control, group decision-making and team interaction? With no formal training, people may find it difficult to make the transition from instructors or managers to facilitators.

This two-day workshop has been created to make core facilitation skills better understood and readily available for your organization. It represents materials and ideas that have been tested and refined over twenty years of active facilitation in all types of settings.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish facilitation from instruction and training
  • Identify the competencies linked to effective small group facilitation
  • Understand the difference between content and process
  • Identify the stages of team development and ways to help teams through each stage
  • Use common process tools to make meetings easier and more productive

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining Your Role
To begin, participants will explore the differences between facilitation, training, and chairing.

How Facilitators Work
Next, participants will explore key facilitation skills, levels of facilitation, facilitation language, and things to do to ensure facilitation success.

Establishing Ground Rules
In this session, participants will discuss ground rules, also known as norms. They will also work together to generate a list of ground rules for the remainder of the workshop.

Content and Process
While facilitators are responsible for the process, it is participants who are responsible for and manage the content. This session will explore the differences between these two aspects of a meeting.

Types of Thinking
Next, participants will learn about divergent thinking and convergent thinking, as well as the grey area (also known as the Groan Zone) between the two.

Handling Controversial Issues
In this session, participants will learn how to handle controversial issues in a neutral and professional way.

Communication Skills
This session will explore the building blocks of good communication: active listening, questioning skills, probing techniques, and managing your body language.

Listening For Common Ground
For most people, it seems to be instinctive to try to find something in common with their fellow humans. In this session, we will explore the importance of listening for common ground in facilitation.

Common Facilitation Techniques
This session will begin with a lecture on 16 important facilitation techniques. Then, participants will divide into groups to prepare and present a short demonstration on a chosen technique.

Providing Effective Feedback
Part of your role as a facilitator includes providing and accepting feedback. This session will give participants some tips on giving and receiving feedback. It will conclude with an exercise that will help them practice this skill.

Managing Divergent Perspectives
Next, participants will learn some ways to manage divergent perspectives. Then, they will apply their knowledge to a case study.

The Language of Facilitation
In this session, participants will learn about some communication elements that are unique to facilitation. Then, they will apply their knowledge to an interactive case study.

Building Agendas
Part of facilitating meetings is developing an agenda. This session will outline a brief, easy process to help facilitators build a good agenda.

Dealing with Difficult Dynamics
In this session, participants will complete a mix and match exercise to identify possible difficult behaviors and ways to manage them. Then, participants will learn about and practice twelve easy, effective ways to intervene in a group discussion.

Building Sustainable Agreements
Getting a group to come to an agreement is not much good if that agreement is not supported by true consensus. This session will give participants ways to build sustainable agreements.

Stages of Team Development
Next, participants will learn about Tuckman and Jensen’s Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, and Adjourning model, which outlines the stages of team development. Participants will also identify some ways to help groups through each stage.

Analysis Tools
The final session will introduce participants to two decision-making tools: SWOT analysis and force field analysis.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Developing Your Training Program

Training is an essential element of development in any organization. Being knowledgeable and continuing to learn throughout your career can make you a very valuable asset. We also know that training and orientation (or ‘onboarding’) for newly hired employees is a key factor in retention.

This two-day workshop is designed for a trainer who wants to develop training programs that are meaningful, practical, and will benefit both trainees and the organizations they work for.

This two day workshop will help you teach participants how to:

  • Describe the essential elements of a training program
  • Apply different methodologies to program design
  • Demonstrate skills in preparation, research, and delivery of strong content
  • Use an instructional model
  • Create a training program proposal

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop.

Program Design
This session will explore some things that need to be considered before committing to developing a training program. We will also look at some situations where training is not appropriate and some alternatives to training.

Identifying Needs
Participants will look at how to determine what training is really necessary using the ICE method: Isolate, Consult, and Evaluate.

The Training Model
Next, we will explore a seven-step instructional systems design model. We will focus on adult learning and some basic principles that apply to developing training.

The Program’s Basic Outline
Next, participants will learn how to create the basic outline for the program by writing objectives for knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA’s).

Evaluation Strategies
Of course, it’s hard to know what you want to teach without knowing how you’ll know you’ve taught it! This session will look at evaluation methods and how they tie into learning objectives.

Defining Your Approach
This session will look at a basic method that participants can use to design their program. We will also explore some specific learning tools, including demonstrations, case studies, guided teaching, study groups, role plays, games and simulations, and e-learning.

Researching and Developing Content
Now that we have a framework for the design of the program, participants will learn where to find the content. We will also talk about fads and copyright issues.

Pre-Assignments in Training
This session will explore the value of pre-assignments through a pre-assignment.

Choosing Openings and Energizers
We will talk about how to start off your training, different types of games, and some ways to make sure your game doesn’t fall flat.

Training Instruments, Assessments, and Tools
Pre-designed testing tools can help with many training topics. This session will discuss how to make the most of these tools.

Creating Supporting Materials
Most trainers prepare notes for themselves to use as they are teaching their program. This session will look at some other materials that can enhance your training program, including student guides, handouts, and electronic slides.

Testing the Program
Participants will discuss ways to test their training program before they deliver it.

Creating Proposals
Participants will learn how to organize and write a training proposal, and then they will apply the knowledge to a case study.

Building Rapport
We will discuss some ways to ensure that your proposal gets approved.

Pulling it all Together
To conclude the course, participants will work together to create individual action plans.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and speak with the trainer.

Advanced Skills for the Practical Trainer

Behind every spectacular training session is a lot of preparation and meticulous attention to detail. The truly skilled trainer can make a program exciting. The learners will have fun while they are learning if the facilitator is able to involve their emotions as well as their minds. You will see the involvement, and you will feel the energy.

To reach this stage as an adult educator isn’t always easy, but success isn’t just for the naturally gifted. It is possible for all of us who put effort into our personal growth and development. We want the enormous satisfaction that comes from working with others to help them reach their potential as human beings. This three-day workshop will help you reach that goal.

This workshop requires that you have a good understanding of basic training principles, including adult learning concepts, Velsoft’s experiential learning cycle, training methods, and designing a learning sequence. We strongly recommend completing Velsoft’s The Practical Trainer workshop before taking this course.

Objectives for this workshop include:

  • Enhance your understanding of learning styles and how to accommodate all four learning styles in the classroom
  • Understand the key principles of effective communication in a workshop setting
  • Use a variety of training techniques to stimulate participation
  • Develop a plan and prepare for an effective training session
  • Understand the different levels of evaluation and when to use each
  • Understand how and when to add fun and humor to your training session
  • Identify advanced interventions for difficult situations
  • Practice the skills needed for a team presentation

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Preparing to Learn
To begin, participants will explore what they want out of this workshop.

Understanding Learning
Next, participants will talk about the role of the facilitator and the top skills a trainer needs.

Competencies for Adult Educators
This session will give participants a profile of the gaps between where they are now and where they need to be in order to perform their role efficiently.

Accommodating Learning Preferences
Next, participants will review Kolb’s experiential learning cycle and how it fits in with different learning styles.

Increasing Your Expertise
This session will explore three basic ideas about adults in a learning context. Participants will also look at the workshop from a designer’s perspective.

Using Existing Materials
In this session, participants will learn about using customizable course material to give them a head start, copyright concerns, and how to over-plan to ensure success.

Managing the Stress of Training
During this session, participants will learn ways to manage their stress and that of trainees.

Planning a Workshop
Next, participants will receive a brief introduction to planning and preparing a workshop.

Visual Aids
This session will cover some basic kinds of visual aids and encourage participants to determine if, how, and when they want to use each type.

Your Role as an Effective Communicator
During this session, participants will learn how to communicate effectively as a facilitator or trainer.

Questioning as a Training Technique
This session will explain how good questioning skills can make anyone a better trainer.

Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Evaluation
Next, participants will explore the four levels of evaluation, including samples for each type. Then, participants will develop their own evaluation for their training session at the end of the workshop.

On-the-Job Support
During this session, participants will explore why on-the-job support is so important after training has taken place, and what they can do to encourage it.

Dealing with Difficult Situations
This session will give participants some tools for dealing with common training problems.

Training in Different Forums
Next, participants will explore some different forums for training, including virtual formats.

Team Teaching
Next, participants will talk about co-facilitation.

Training Preparation and Presentations
The bulk of the third day will be spent preparing, presenting, and evaluating team training sessions.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Train the Trainer Courses

Train the Trainer Courses:

  • Advanced Skills for the Practical Trainer || Outline ||
  • Developing Your Training Program || Outline ||
  • Facilitation Skills || Outline ||
  • Survival Skills for the New Trainer || Outline ||
  • The Practical Trainer || Outline ||
  • Using Activities to Make Training Fun || Outline ||