Archive for the ‘Courses’ Category

Workplace Harassment: What It Is and What To Do About It

In 2009 alone, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ordered that $294,200,000 (that’s 294.2 million dollars!) be paid out for discrimination and harassment charges. (http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/statistics/enforcement/all.cfm) No wonder companies are working to be more proactive in preventing harassment.

But how do you prevent harassment from occurring? What sorts of policies should be in place? What should managers do to protect their employees? And if a complaint is filed, what will we do? All of these questions (and more!) will be answered in this two-day workshop.

This two-day workshop will help you teach participants how to:

  • Understand what is acceptable behavior in the workplace and what is not, and why
  • Understand the benefits of harassment training
  • Define the various types of harassment, including sexual harassment
  • Help their organization create a harassment policy
  • Prevent harassment
  • Protect themselves from harassment
  • Act if they are harassed or accused of harassment
  • Understand the complaint process, from the complaint to the reply, to mediation or investigation, to a solution
  • Identify situations where mediation is appropriate, and understand how mediation works in those situations
  • Identify appropriate solutions for a harassment incident
  • Act if a complaint is false
  • Help their workplace return to normal after a harassment incident

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining Harassment
This session will look at legal, literary, and reasonable man/woman definitions of harassment.

The Purpose of Training
We will discuss what kind of harassment training can benefit an organization.

Sexual Harassment
This session will discuss sexual harassment in a lecture and small group work. Topics covered include the definition of sexual harassment, the components of harassment, and common scenarios that could be construed as harassment.

Creating a Harassment Policy
The best way to prevent harassment from occurring is by setting a clear policy, educating employees about it, and enforcing it. We will discuss some basics of creating, implementing, and monitoring a policy, plus some training points.

Other Prevention Strategies
Participants will explore some other ways of preventing harassment in groups.

Nipping it in the Bud
One of the most important prevention strategies is for managers to carefully monitor their workplace. During this session we will use a lecture and a role play to talk about how managers can do this.

Protecting Yourself
There are many things that you can do to minimize your risk of being harassed or of being perceived as a harasser. We will discuss six of them.

What if it Happens to Me?
During this session we will discuss what you can do if someone is harassing you, including techniques for saying no. Participants will then practice these techniques during a role play.

What if it’s Happening to Someone Else?
There will often be situations where a manager thinks or knows that harassment is occurring, but a complaint has not been filed. We will discuss what to do in this situation.

Someone has Filed a Complaint Against Me!
If you are in the situation where someone has filed a complaint against you, do not panic. There are several steps that you can take to deal with the situation appropriately, all of which will be discussed in detail during this session.

Addressing a Complaint
No matter how proactive you are, most employers receive a harassment complaint at some point in time. We will discuss the four key components of dealing with a complaint fairly and appropriately.

False Complaints
If you suspect that a harassment complaint is false, you must be very careful when dealing with it. This session will discuss some things that you can do in this situation.

Mediation
When the claimant decides to file a complaint, mediation may be offered as an alternative. We will discuss what mediation is, when it is and isn’t appropriate, and how the process may work. Participants will also have an opportunity to role play mediation.

Investigating a Complaint
Investigating harassment complaints often requires special training and skills. During this session, we will cover some basics of investigation, including when a complaint should and should not be investigated, who should be involved, what the investigation process should look like, and how results can be reported.

Making the Decision
During this session we will talk about who should make the final decision about the complaint. We will also discuss when you should involve legal counsel.

Solutions
There are three possible solutions to a harassment complaint: solutions for the complainant, solutions for the respondent, and solutions for the organization. We will explore possibilities for each case during this session.

After It’s Over
Once the harassment complaint has been resolved, everyone should try to get back to normal life. This session will discuss how managers and the organization as a whole can help employees make this transition.

Role Play
The afternoon of day two will be spent role playing four stages of the harassment process: the initial consultation with an advisor, the filing of a formal complaint, an investigation, and the decision. Detailed case files are provided with the course.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Workplace Violence: How to Manage Anger and Violence in the Workplace

This three-day course will help you teach participants how to:

  • Understand what workplace violence is
  • Identify some warning signs of violence
  • Understand the cycle of anger
  • Understand Albert Bandura’s behavior wheel and how it applies to anger
  • Use a seven-step process for managing their anger and others’ anger
  • Have better communication and problem solving skills, which will reduce frustration and anger
  • Develop some other ways of managing anger, including coping thoughts and relaxation techniques
  • Use the nine components of an organizational approach to managing anger, including risk assessment processes
  • Act if a violent incident occurs in the workplace, on both an individual and organizational level

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

What is Workplace Violence?
To start the workshop, we will examine what workplace violence is, the cycle of violence, and some warning signs.

Understanding the Behavior Wheel
During this session, we will look at Albert Bandura’s behavior wheel and we will explore how it applies to violence and anger.

The Anger Management Process
Dr. Lynn McClure, an anger management specialist, has identified a seven-step process to manage anger (yours or someone else’s). We will examine this process in detail through a lecture and through role play presentations.

Communicating Better
Communicating effectively can often help prevent people from getting angry. We will explore some key communication skills, including a four-step assertive message, listening skills, questioning skills, and three keys to unlock the best in people.

Basic Problem-Solving Tools
Being an effective problem solver is another way a person can help prevent anger. We will spend most of the afternoon of Day One looking at a three-phase problem solving model and a problem solving toolkit. Participants will then apply these skills to a case study and to a personal problem.

Other Ways of Managing Anger
During this session, participants will discover some ways to manage their own anger, including coping thoughts, strategies to unwind, and relaxation techniques.

A Systems Approach
The second day of the workshop will focus on how an organization can plan to prevent workplace violence, using Norman Keith’s nine stage plan as a framework.

Developing a Policy and Program
A properly implemented violence policy and program is crucial to preventing workplace violence. We will look at both the policy and the program in detail.

Risk Assessment
A risk assessment will help the organization identify possible security and safety concerns. We will look at a five-step plan that any organization can use to assess these risks. Participants will apply this plan to a case study.

Hiring Practices
During this session, we will discuss some things that you can do at the hiring stage to help prevent workplace violence.

Workplace Design
The physical environment of the workplace can contribute to, or help prevent, workplace violence. We will explore some of these considerations through a case study.

Workplace Practices and Procedures
We will look at how training, Human Resources policies, staff management, and security measures can help make your workplace a safer place. Participants will then complete a case study to apply these ideas.

Security Systems and Personnel
During this session, we will look at some things that a security system can be made up of, including security staff, access restrictions, surveillance cameras, and intercoms. Then, participants will design a security plan for the Acme Widgets Company.

Training Programs
Training staff in some of the skills that we have learned, such as problem solving or communication, can also help prevent violence. We will learn about an eight-step plan that can help participants identify, plan, and implement training programs.

Developing Emergency Response Plans
It is crucial that employees know what to do in case of an incident. We will discuss some incidents to be prepared for and we will discuss what an ERP should cover.

Program Review
Constant review and re-evaluation are necessary to ensure your violence prevention program works. We will look at some components of this review and when it should be performed.

Developing a Threat Response Process
For the third day of the workshop, we will work on developing a plan to respond to a violent threat or incident. We will use a fourteen stage plan developed by Drs. James Turner, Michael Gelles, and Chris Hatcher, as our framework. Participants will take on the role of the threat assessment team. They work on a single case study throughout the day.

The Immediate Response
To begin the day, we will look at what to do when you are part of a violent incident.

Consulting with the Experts
Depending on the situation, you may find that you need outside help. This session will discuss who should be brought in, when they should be contacted, and how they should be contacted.

Gathering Additional Information
Once the basic facts have been gathered and outside experts have been consulted, the threat assessment team should determine what other information is necessary. This session will provide some things that should be considered.

Re-Evaluation
During this session, we will look at two key processes that will help the threat assessment team determine their next steps.

Communication
The next step in the threat response process is to establish a communication plan. We will give participants a template and some tips on communicating effectively.

Employee Interview
Stages seven and eight in the threat response process involve talking to the violent person. We will look at how to plan and interview the person, and then participants will have a chance to role play an interview.

Risk Level Analysis
At this stage, the threat assessment team will have gathered enough information to determine the severity of the threat or incident. We will look at a five-stage continuum that can help the team decide how to respond to the threat based on the severity level.

Review and Options
Once the team has identified the severity level, a long term plan can be put into place. During this session, we will look at some options that can be used.

Analyzing the Impact
Now that the threat has been dealt with, it is time to debrief the affected people. We will look at some people that will likely need follow-up and forms that follow-up can take.

Incident Response Checklist
During this session, we will look at a checklist developed by Dr. Robert Turner that the threat assessment team can use throughout the threat response process.

Process Application
To wrap up the day, we will review the case study presented at the beginning of the day and how it moved through the various steps of the threat response process

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Workplace Ergonomics: Injury Prevention Through Ergonomics

The human body is a fragile system, and we put many demands on it every day. Activities like reaching to get supplies off of a shelf, sitting in front of a computer for hours every day, and moving heavy products around the shop can all take a toll on our bodies. In this two-day workshop, you will learn how to make your environment as ergonomic as possible in order to make daily tasks easier on your body and mind.

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Getting Started
To begin, participants will define ergonomics and the types of injuries that result from unresolved ergonomic hazards. Participants will also explore the major risk factors of ergonomic injuries and the cost to the workplace. Then, participants will learn how to find out what legislation and regulation applies to their area.

The Role of Ergonomics in Your Workplace
This session will explore some different ways that workplaces can address ergonomic issues.

The Ergonomic Assessment Cycle
Like any effort, ergonomic improvement should be structured and scheduled. This session will give participants a framework that they can adapt and use for their ergonomic efforts.

Identifying and Assessing Ergonomic Hazards
Next, participants will look at the first two stages of the ergonomic cycle: identifying and assessing hazards. This session will provide participants with various methods and tools to identify ergonomic hazards, including sample checklists and symptom surveys. Participants will also have the opportunity to apply these skills to a case study.

Developing a Plan to Address Ergonomic Issues
This session will look at the third stage of the ergonomic cycle: planning for improvements. We will focus on the three key methods of hazard resolution: engineering controls, organizational changes, and individual changes. Participants will continue working on their case study and apply this new knowledge.

Identifying and Implementing Solutions
At this point in the cycle, you know what the major ergonomic hazards are and you know that there are three main categories of solutions. But where do you find concrete, practical ideas to resolve ergonomic hazards? This session will give participants a few starting points.

Obtaining Employee Buy-In
So far, we have covered a plan to identify, evaluate, and address ergonomic hazards in the workplace. However, all of your organization’s ergonomic efforts will not succeed without the cooperation of the employees who will be affected by the changes. This session will help participants understand the basics of change management.

Tips for Successful Implementation
This session will give participants some ideas for making ergonomic changes as easy as possible for employees.

Reviewing Your Ergonomics Program
Another important part of successful implementation and ergonomic hazard management is review and evaluation. This session will give participants a sample follow-up schedule and some key things to check for.

Basic Ergonomic Principles
Day Two of this workshop will begin with a discussion of some basic principles of ergonomics.

Optimal Sitting and Standing
This session will give participants some tips for making sitting and standing as ergonomic as possible. Participants will also identify some areas of improvement for their training facility.

Safe Lifting and Transporting
According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, a large percentage of workplace injuries result from improper heavy lifting. This session will explore how ergonomics can make lifting, carrying, and transporting materials safer and easier.

Ergonomic Workstations
Next, participants will learn how to design an ergonomic workstation. (This includes any kind of job where a desk is used, whether it involves a computer or not.)

Safe Tool Selection and Use
This session will explore safe tool design, ergonomic handgrips, and vibration measurements.

Creating an Ergonomic Environment
There are three components to an ergonomic environment: proper lighting, good air quality, and noise control. This session will explore each of these elements in depth. At the end of the session, participants will apply their knowledge to a case study.

Bringing It All Together
To wrap up the course, participants will examine a snapshot of a company at work, identify ergonomic hazards, and develop a solution plan.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Strategic Planning

If you and the people who work with you don’t understand where the company is going, they may all develop their own priorities and actually prevent you from getting where you need to be. Part of getting everyone on board is creating a strategic plan complete with the organization’s values, vision, and mission. Then, there’s the challenge of bringing these principles to life in a meaningful way that people can relate to. This two-day course will help you describe what you want to do and get people where you want to go.

This two-day workshop will help you teach participants how to:

  • Identify the values that support their company
  • Define the vision for their company
  • Write a mission statement that explains what the company’s purpose is
  • Complete meaningful SWOT analyses
  • Apply tools and techniques to create a strategic plan that directs the organization from the executive to the front line
  • Implement, evaluate, and review a strategic plan
  • Identify how related tools, such as the strategy map and balanced scorecard, can help them develop a strategic plan

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Understanding Strategic Planning
Then, participants will explore what strategic planning is. They will also be introduced to the pyramid strategic plan structure that will form the basis of the rest of the course.

Identifying Our Values
Next, participants will work through the foundation of a strategic plan: value identification and writing values statements.

Designing Our Vision
The next step in a strategic plan is to identify your vision. In this session, participants will think about where they want their company to be in several years’ time.

On a Mission
The next part of the strategic plan is to write a mission statement. That’s what participants will focus on in this session.

Performing a SWOT Analysis
In this session, participants will learn how to use a SWOT analysis to identify where they currently are and what they need to do to get where they want to go.

Setting Goals
Next, participants will learn how to use the SPIRIT model to frame goals and objectives.

Assigning Roles, Responsibilities, and Accountabilities
The final piece of the strategic plan gets at the heart of getting the work done by assigning who will address each role and what they are accountable for. This session will give participants some ways to perform this step. They will also get hands-on problem solving practice through a case study.

The Full Picture
Participants will begin the second day with a snapshot of the strategic planning cycle and a review activity.

Gathering Support
In this session, participants will look at gathering support for a plan, creating a review process, and obtaining buy-in.

Making the Change
Strategic plans naturally become harbingers of change. This session will give participants some ways to help people transition through that change.

How Does It Look?
Next, participants will look at some different ways to present their strategic plan. Infographics, reports, and presentations will all be discussed.

Getting There
This session will explore what problems can occur during the strategic planning process and how to deal with them. Security considerations will also be discussed. The session will wrap up with an introduction to strategy maps and balanced scorecards.

Mocking Up the Process
The course will conclude with an in-depth capping exercise to help participants apply what they have learned to either their organization or a fictional company.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Safety in the Workplace

This one-day workshop will help you teach participants how to:

  • Understand the difference between a safety program and a safety culture
  • Identify resources to help them understand the regulations in your area
  • Launch a safety committee
  • Identify hazards and reduce them
  • Implement hiring measures that can improve safety
  • Begin creating a safety training program
  • Identify groups particularly at risk for injury and how to protect them
  • Help their organization write, implement, and review a safety plan
  • Respond to incidents and near misses
  • Perform basic accident investigation and documentation

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining a Safety Culture
This session will explore the idea of a safety culture. Participants will also be asked to identify how safety applies to their organization.

Governing Bodies and Resources
It is essential that organizations map their safety plan to regulations in their area. This session will look at some of the key organizations and how to contact them.

Getting Started
A good first safety step is establishing a safety committee. This session will give participants some ideas on getting started.

Identifying Hazards
Hazard identification typically forms the basis for a safety plan. We will look at some ways of identifying hazards and then we will apply those methods to a case study.

Resolving Hazards
Hazard resolution is the logical step to take after hazard identification. We will look at three ways of resolving hazards and then we will apply those methods to a case study.

Taking Proactive Measures
There are measures you can take when hiring and training employees to make your workplace safer. This session will explore these measures through lecture and discussion.

Identifying Groups at Risk
During this session, we will look at a number of factors that can increase a person’s risk of accident. We will also look at how to mitigate these risks.

Writing a Safety Plan
Everything that we have discussed so far will come together to create a safety plan.

Implementing the Plan
Your safety culture will only be a success if it is accepted and adopted by your employees. We will discuss just how to do this in a lecture.

Incident Management
No matter how well your safety culture is implemented and accepted, there will still be incidents. This session will look at how to respond to, document, and investigate incidents. We will also discuss how to handle near misses.

Reviewing the Program
The final essential component of your safety plan is to include a review process. We will look at when and how the plan should be evaluated.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Lean Process Improvement

Lean principles have come a long way over the past three hundred years. From Benjamin Franklin’s early ideas, to Henry Ford’s work in the 1920’s and the Toyoda precepts in the 1930’s, to Jeffery Liker’s publication of The Toyota Way in 2004, Lean processes have evolved from a simple concept to a set of widely used best practices.

This two-day course will help you give participants the foundation to begin implementing Lean process improvement tools in their workplace. The first day will explore the foundations of Lean through the Toyota precepts and the five critical improvement concepts (value, waste, variation, complexity, and continuous improvement). The second day will give participants tools to perform continuous improvement in their organization, including 5S, 5W-2H, PDSA, DMAIC, Kaizen, Genchi Genbutsu, and various Lean data mapping methods.

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define Lean and its key terms
  • Describe the Toyota Production System and the TPS house
  • Describe the five critical improvement concepts
  • Use the Kano model to understand, describe, analyze, and improve value
  • Identify and reduce various types of waste
  • Create a plan for a more environmentally Lean organization
  • Use the PDSA and R-DMAIC-S models to plan, execute, and evaluate Lean changes
  • Use Lean thinking frameworks, including 5W-2H, Genchi Genbutsu and Gemba
  • Prepare for and complete a basic 5-S
  • Describe the key elements of Kaizen events, particularly a Kaizen blitz
  • Gather, analyze, and interpret data using flow charts, Ishikawa (fishbone) diagrams, SIPOC diagrams, and value stream maps
  • Go back to their organization with a plan to begin incorporating Lean into their corporate culture

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Understanding Lean
To start, participants will learn what Lean is and what its origins are. Participants will also learn about the Toyoda Precepts, how Lean differs from Six Sigma, and some common Lean terms.

The Toyota Production System
Next, participants will learn about the Toyota Production System as presented by Jeffery Liker.

The Toyota Production System House
In this session, participants will learn about another representation of the Toyota Production System.

The Five Critical Improvement Concepts
Then, you will discuss five key ideas supporting Lean process improvement: value, waste, variation, complexity, and continuous improvement.

Understanding Value with the Kano Model
This session will explore value with the Kano model, which divides product or system characteristics into three groups: basic, performance, and value added.

Types of Waste
In this session, participants will learn about the three main wastes (muda, muri, and mura) as well as some new types.

Creating a Lean Enterprise
Next, participants will explore some ways to create an environmentally friendly organization with Lean. They will also learn about John Bicheno’s 20 keys to a Lean organization.

The Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) Cycle
The first session of Day Two will cover the PDSA cycle, which should be used to plan and implement organizational changes.

Using the R-DMAIC-S Model
This session will cover the Recognize – Define – Measure – Analyze – Improve – Control – Sustain model, an advanced version of PDSA primarily used in Six Sigma.

Lean Thinking Tools
Next, participants will learn about some Lean thinking tools, including 5W-2H, Genchi Genbutsu, Gemba, and 5-S.

Kaizen Events
This session will cover the five levels of Kaizen events, with a focus on Level 3 (the Kaizen blitz).

Data Gathering and Mapping
Most of the second afternoon will be spent learning about and practicing various Lean data tools, including flow charts, Ishikawa (cause and effect or fishbone) diagrams, SIPOC charts, and value stream maps. We will also share some tips for effective data analysis.

A Plan to Take Home
The final session will challenge participants to think about roadblocks and pitfalls to Lean implementation and how to bring those lessons to their organization. Participants will also be given some ideas for Lean projects and a framework for a successful Lean approach.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the workshop, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Employee Accountability

Organizations who promote accountability are inherently more successful and more productive. In this one-day workshop, participants will learn about what accountability is, how to promote it in their organization, and how to become more accountable to themselves and others.

This course will help you teach participants:

  • What accountability is and what events in history have shaped our view of it
  • The requirements for personal and corporate accountability
  • The cycle of accountability and the fundamental elements required to build an accountable organization
  • What individuals must do to become accountable
  • Skills required for accountability, including goal-setting, giving and receiving feedback, and delegation
  • Ways to build ownership in their organization

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining Accountability
To get started, participants will learn what accountability is. Then, they will explore how history has shaped the recent call for accountability in society. Finally, participants will discuss practices that encourage and discourage accountability personally and professionally.

Creating an Accountable Organization
This session will explore the accountability cycle, the building blocks of accountability, and how participants can start being more accountable.

Setting Goals and Expectations
In order for people to be accountable, they need to know what they are going to be accountable for! This session will explore two ways to do this: set goals with employees and communicate expectations in a structured way. Participants will also learn ways to create ownership in their organization.

Doing Delegation Right
Delegation is key for building accountability in an organization. This session will give some participants ways to delegate successfully.

Offering Feedback
Next, participants will learn ways to give others constructive feedback and how to accept criticism.

A Toolbox for Managers
To conclude the course, participants will explore areas for further learning.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Diversity Training: Celebrating Diversity in the Workplace

This one-day course will help you teach participants:

  • What diversity and its related terms mean
  • To be aware of how aware they are of diversity and where they can improve
  • Understand how changes in the world can affect them and their view
  • To identify their stereotypes
  • What terms are politically correct and which are not, and why
  • The four cornerstones of diversity
  • What the pitfalls are relating to diversity and how to avoid them
  • A technique for dealing with inappropriate behavior
  • A management style to encourage diversity
  • What to do if they or one of their employees feels discriminated against

Introduction and Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining Diversity
Participants will begin by defining diversity and related terms, including affirmative action, bias, stereotype, and Equal Employment Opportunity.

How Does Diversity Affect Me?
This session will help participants identify how a changing world has affected them. Participants will also complete a self-awareness inventory to identify possible areas for improvement.

Identifying Stereotypes
During this session, participants will explore stereotypes from different angles through a lecture and two group exercises.

Wise Words
In this era of political correctness, it’s sometimes hard to keep up with words that have become inappropriate. We will take a look at some phrases that are considered universally incorrect and some basic guidelines. We’ll also take a humorous look at some phrases that have gone too far.

The Cornerstones of Diversity
Diversity experts Armida Russell, Amy Tolbert, and Frank Wilderman have identified four cornerstones of diversity development. They are knowledge, acceptance, understanding, and behavior. We will examine each cornerstone in detail during this session.

How to Discourage Diversity
There are some practices that discourage diversity more than they encourage it. We will look at four common mistakes and how to avoid them.

The STOP Technique
Diversity expert Lenora Billings-Harris has developed a four-step technique that you can use when someone is behaving in an inappropriate manner. It’s called STOP. Participants will learn about the technique through a lecture and will then practice it in a role play.

Managing for Diversity
During this brief lecture, we will look at some simple things managers and employees can do to encourage diversity in their workplace.

Dealing with Discrimination
To wrap up the day, we will discuss how to deal with discrimination as a manager and an employee.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Disability Awareness: Working with People with Disabilities

People with disabilities represent a significant and largely underutilized resource for businesses. Many disabled persons are underemployed or unemployed. As a result of advocates for diversity, as well as a shrinking labor pool, employers are taking a serious look at hiring and retaining people with disabilities. This two-day workshop will give supervisors, managers, and human resource consultants tools and tips for creating a diverse workplace.

During this workshop, participants will learn to:

  • Prepare to welcome people with disabilities into their workplace
  • Interact with people with disabilities
  • Identify and overcome barriers in the workplace
  • Use respectful, appropriate, acceptable language in any circumstance
  • Understand what their company can do during hiring and interviewing
  • Understand what job accommodation is and how it applies in their workplace

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Defining Terms
To start, participants will learn what the terms “disabilities” and “stereotypes” mean.

Misconceptions and Realities
There are plenty of misconceptions, as well as realities, to working with people with disabilities. We’ll explore some of those in this session.

A Business Case
In this session, participants will complete a case study to explore why companies should hire people with disabilities.

Dissecting Labels
This session will discuss why labels are inappropriate and how they can make people feel. We will also provide participants with some ground rules for being respectful and using appropriate language, as well as how to be practical when discussing a disability. Several lists of inappropriate terms and more appropriate language will be provided.

Accessibility
Accessibility refers to making your workplace, and your business, available to people. Although laws differ between regions, this session will cover some basics of physical accessibility. Attitudinal barriers will also be discussed.

The Cornerstones of Diversity
Diversity experts Armida Russell, Amy Tolbert, and Frank Wilderman have identified four cornerstones of diversity development. They are knowledge, acceptance, understanding, and behavior. We will examine each cornerstone in detail during this session.

Encouraging Diversity by Hiring
This session will address two key hiring issues: what can the company ask, and what can the candidate expect?

Using the STOP Technique
Diversity expert Lenora Billings-Harris has developed a four-step technique that you can use when someone is behaving in an inappropriate manner. It’s called STOP! Participants will learn about the technique through a lecture and will then practice it in a role play.

Communication Essentials for Disability Awareness
In this session, we will talk about respecting confidentiality, preparing documentation, and where to find good resources.

Communication Styles
This session will allow participants to take a more objective look at the advantages and disadvantages of both sides of different dichotomies related to communication styles.

Critical Conversations
Next, we will give participants a framework for discussing disabilities. We will include specific questions that are appropriate for gathering information without infringing on an employee’s rights.

How Do We Make It Happen?
To wrap up the course, we will explore how you can use accommodation and job shadowing to create a truly accessible workplace.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Crisis Management

Viable organizations need to be ready for emergencies because they are a fact of doing business. The worst plan is not to have any kind of plan at all, and the best plans are tested and adjusted so that they work over time. Fortunately, you do not need separate plans for fire, weather disasters, and all the different kinds of crises that can occur. One solid plan will help you to prevent, respond, and recover from all crises. This two-day course will help you ensure your organization is ready to manage any kind of crisis.

This two-day workshop will help you teach participants how to:

  • Assign people to an appropriate crisis team role
  • Conduct a crisis audit
  • Establish the means for business continuity
  • Determine how to manage incidents
  • Help teams recover from a crisis
  • Apply the crisis management process

Course Overview
You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

What is Crisis Management?
To begin, participants will explore what crisis management means. They will also look at the components of a crisis management team.

Training Leaders and Staff
Next, participants will learn what elements should be considered when developing a training program.

Conducting the Crisis Audit
In this session, participants will learn about the different facets of a crisis audit. They will also learn about using a risk matrix.

Performing a Risk Level Analysis
Then, participants will learn another way to assess risks: risk level analysis. They will also have an opportunity to practice risk level analysis in a series of case studies.

Developing a Response Process
Participants will begin this session by reviewing their pre-assignment. Then, we will share our suggested crisis response process.

Consulting with the Experts
Do you need consultants and outside experience on your crisis management team? This session will help participants decide.

Incident Management Techniques
In this session, participants will learn ways to respond to, document, and investigate crisis incidents.

Working through the Issues
A problem solving process can help crisis management team members stay in control and get things done. This session shares a three-phase model that can be used as a starting point.

Establishing an Emergency Operations Center
Your crisis management team will need a place to work during a crisis. This session will explore how to set up an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and how to establish a chain of command.

Building Business Continuity and Recovery
Next, participants will consider how to keep their business running during a crisis. The essential elements of a crisis plan will also be discussed.

Walliallia
Participants will spend most of the afternoon of Day Two working through three case studies to apply what they have learned.

Recovering and Moving On
The final session of this course will explore ways to help people recover from a crisis and move forward.

Workshop Wrap-Up
At the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.